Canadian Education Association: What did you do in school today?

In my role as LD/Literacy Consultant and supporter of student engagement and diverse learners, I booked Karen Hume, the Canadian guru on Differentiated Instruction, for the November 30th Professional Development Day in Vancouver. Not only did she offer the audience practical tips for teaching and engaging diverse learners, but she also pointed us to a brilliant resource, What did you do in school today, an national initiative of the Canadian Education Society (CEA) which has been examining student engagement in school and learning since 2007. Check it out at www.cea-ace.ca. There are numerous research articles, but one caught my eye : "A senior administrator’s view of technology and learning" written by Vancouver’s former Deputy Superintendent, Jordan Tinney, now in the the same position in Surrey School District. And as with any foray into web browsing, I connected from there to his blog, www.jordantinney.org where among other things there are engaging and practical tips on leadership and how to institute real change and innovation, beginning with "why should we do this?", an aspect of educational change that is often forgotten by Ministry officials. He shows clips from Simon Sinek’s TED Talk, which, although it largely refers to the corporate world, also looks at the successes of great leaders. The example that caught my eye was about Martin Luther King, who "gave the I Have a Dream" speech, not the "I Have a Plan" speech and held a quarter of a million people captive with his words. Definitely food for thought for all the change-makers out there.

Pamela Hansen
LD/Literacy Consultant

Advertisements

About phansenvsb

I am passionate about teaching reading and writing to a diverse audience from those experiencing challenges in reading and writing to those who seek deep enrichment in literature and its connections to the world in which it was written and to the present day. I also present workshops on assessment for learning, differentiated instruction, literature circles, disciplinary literacy, and inquiry.
This entry was posted in Professional Development. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s